Hi, i'm Midnight and this blog will be about anime, mainly Naruto but some other anime's will appear as well, yaoi, NaruSasuNaru-my OTP, fanficton, Sherlock, Supernatural and random other fandoms and things I like.
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Reblogged from ichaichasasunaru  140 notes
inyous:

Am I the only one who’s honestly excited to see Sasuke school Naruto about ninja politics next chapter? Because I am far from rooting for Naruto to own Sasuke (people who do are missing the entire point of this manga’s plot, as well as its most important (albeit forced) parallels).
Note that I only say I want Sasuke to teach Naruto about how the world works (I also agree with Sasuke’s conviction that the shinobi system needs revolution, but I’m not too sure I will like his methods). Because let’s be honest here: for a character who has such strong political ambitions, Naruto pays too little attention to history and hasn’t expressed any concrete plans for how exactly he would go about fixing the world’s problems. I doubt he’s even aware of the significance of the place he and Sasuke are standing in. Sure he is aware of how the war of the transmigrants began, but he doesn’t have the entire picture; he doesn’t know how Hokage came to be, and more importantly, just what a terrible effect it had on everyone, especially Sasuke.
Instead Naruto is gleefully parroting Itachi’s words, completely unaware that the ideology behind them is flawed and that it eventually destroyed his and Sasuke’s families (I’ll get to this later). He seems to think that the problem lies with Sasuke misunderstanding what it means to be a Hokage… but he’s wrong. Sasuke knows damn well - all too well - what that means. Sasuke recognises that if someone doesn’t change what it means, history is only going to repeat itself. And Naruto’s failure to recognise the need for a redefinition of this meaning makes him a direct threat to the fulfillment of Sasuke’s ideal.
Now I don’t particularly see the “pseodo-democratic” system Konoha adopted as all that “bad”, but it nevertheless has an inherent flaw that’s overlooked to an alarmingly high degree: widely held views accepted by the majority are not just or true by default.
For instance, the case of Madara. It’s very funny (and very depressing) to note that he’s almost universally misunderstood - by people within and outside his universe. This man did not abandon Konoha for selfish pride or a lust for power. Konoha was his dream. A dream he was forced to give up but still wanted more than anything. The fact that he couldn’t allow himself to trust Hashirama until it was too late does not change that. Unfortunately, by the time he finally softened and decided to believe it could work, his previous hostility, distrustfulness, and disgraceful emotional outburts had already made him an unsympathetic figure.
Most people could not see Madara for the man he truly was. They didn’t know that he and Hashirama had once been close friends. They didn’t know that he loved him dearly. They didn’t know that he had been forced to become his enemy. They didn’t know he had agreed to peace because he wanted to. They didn’t know he did not want to betray them. Judging by the public’s attitude towards him, they only saw what was on the surface: i.e. Madara was a stubborn, temperamental warmonger who drove his clan to exhaustion until wonderful Hashirama saved everyone from his madness and forced him to surrender. In this case, the majority did not believe that Madara had truly meant awell. Unfortunately, they had been wrong. And so the fact that many people (Senju included) did not trust Madara and his clan (despite the fact that he had poignantly chosen to trust them), nor believed he was a willing participant in the journey towards peace, nor were willing to check the scales being tipped even more heavily in the Senju’s favour, nor expressed concern for the setting up of the Uchiha for eternal subjugation, eventually poisoned Madara and drove him to do what he did.
Bottom line: the alliance that formed Konoha was not equal and came about in the worst of circumstances. In short, Konoha wasn’t the settlement Madara had dreamed of. It wasn’t Madara’s and Hashirama’s village, something that Uchiha and Senju had an equal stake in - but a villlage ruled by Hashirama, his clan, and whoever did not have the inclination (or power) to threaten the Senju’s ideology.
This system created the suffering Naruto and Sasuke had to endure. Naruto is not fully aware of this - Sasuke is. Sasuke needs to make him realise just what is at stake, and Naruto needs to convince him that they can work together. Throughout this manga, Sasuke has been one of the strongest influences on Naruto’s life and has inspired change in him many times. Thus having Sasuke simply be defeated and “converted” to Naruto’s way of thinking would utterly defeat the point of his character - reducing him to little more than a hollow plot device. Sasuke is not the only one who needs to work on his ideals and compromise.

inyous:

Am I the only one who’s honestly excited to see Sasuke school Naruto about ninja politics next chapter? Because I am far from rooting for Naruto to own Sasuke (people who do are missing the entire point of this manga’s plot, as well as its most important (albeit forced) parallels).

Note that I only say I want Sasuke to teach Naruto about how the world works (I also agree with Sasuke’s conviction that the shinobi system needs revolution, but I’m not too sure I will like his methods). Because let’s be honest here: for a character who has such strong political ambitions, Naruto pays too little attention to history and hasn’t expressed any concrete plans for how exactly he would go about fixing the world’s problems. I doubt he’s even aware of the significance of the place he and Sasuke are standing in. Sure he is aware of how the war of the transmigrants began, but he doesn’t have the entire picture; he doesn’t know how Hokage came to be, and more importantly, just what a terrible effect it had on everyone, especially Sasuke.

Instead Naruto is gleefully parroting Itachi’s words, completely unaware that the ideology behind them is flawed and that it eventually destroyed his and Sasuke’s families (I’ll get to this later). He seems to think that the problem lies with Sasuke misunderstanding what it means to be a Hokage… but he’s wrong. Sasuke knows damn well - all too well - what that means. Sasuke recognises that if someone doesn’t change what it means, history is only going to repeat itself. And Naruto’s failure to recognise the need for a redefinition of this meaning makes him a direct threat to the fulfillment of Sasuke’s ideal.

Now I don’t particularly see the “pseodo-democratic” system Konoha adopted as all that “bad”, but it nevertheless has an inherent flaw that’s overlooked to an alarmingly high degree: widely held views accepted by the majority are not just or true by default.

For instance, the case of Madara. It’s very funny (and very depressing) to note that he’s almost universally misunderstood - by people within and outside his universe. This man did not abandon Konoha for selfish pride or a lust for power. Konoha was his dream. A dream he was forced to give up but still wanted more than anything. The fact that he couldn’t allow himself to trust Hashirama until it was too late does not change that. Unfortunately, by the time he finally softened and decided to believe it could work, his previous hostility, distrustfulness, and disgraceful emotional outburts had already made him an unsympathetic figure.

Most people could not see Madara for the man he truly was. They didn’t know that he and Hashirama had once been close friends. They didn’t know that he loved him dearly. They didn’t know that he had been forced to become his enemy. They didn’t know he had agreed to peace because he wanted to. They didn’t know he did not want to betray them. Judging by the public’s attitude towards him, they only saw what was on the surface: i.e. Madara was a stubborn, temperamental warmonger who drove his clan to exhaustion until wonderful Hashirama saved everyone from his madness and forced him to surrender. In this case, the majority did not believe that Madara had truly meant awell. Unfortunately, they had been wrong. And so the fact that many people (Senju included) did not trust Madara and his clan (despite the fact that he had poignantly chosen to trust them), nor believed he was a willing participant in the journey towards peace, nor were willing to check the scales being tipped even more heavily in the Senju’s favour, nor expressed concern for the setting up of the Uchiha for eternal subjugation, eventually poisoned Madara and drove him to do what he did.

Bottom line: the alliance that formed Konoha was not equal and came about in the worst of circumstances. In short, Konoha wasn’t the settlement Madara had dreamed of. It wasn’t Madara’s and Hashirama’s village, something that Uchiha and Senju had an equal stake in - but a villlage ruled by Hashirama, his clan, and whoever did not have the inclination (or power) to threaten the Senju’s ideology.

This system created the suffering Naruto and Sasuke had to endure. Naruto is not fully aware of this - Sasuke is. Sasuke needs to make him realise just what is at stake, and Naruto needs to convince him that they can work together. Throughout this manga, Sasuke has been one of the strongest influences on Naruto’s life and has inspired change in him many times. Thus having Sasuke simply be defeated and “converted” to Naruto’s way of thinking would utterly defeat the point of his character - reducing him to little more than a hollow plot device. Sasuke is not the only one who needs to work on his ideals and compromise.